Patrick Porten
Patrick Porten
11:00am - 6:00pm
Regular Programming
Request a Song
My Profile
Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Receive Exclusive Updates and Special Offers from WKEB!

     



Custom Search



Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)
Name:
Email:
Your email address is never published.
View Results
Local News
Subscribe To This Feed

Taylor County Budget Cuts Delayed?


12/11/14  Budget Cuts Delayed?

 

  The Taylor County budget cutting meeting took on a “we’ll do it later” theme on Thursday.  The combined Personnel and Finance committee meeting started with chairman Chuck Zenner expressing the opinion that the committee was moving too fast.  He said the goal to have a list of $500,000 in 2016 budget cuts before January 15th is “insane”. 
  Scott Mildebrand indicated he understood that with proposed budgetary cuts, the county could lessen the impact.  "If we don’t make cuts we could be $915,000 short in 2016".

  Tim Hanson said that 2015’s budget is done, and we have 10 months to get 2016 done. 

  Lester Lewis said the reason he proposed a referendum was so the county wouldn’t have to cut services.  He said if we wait until October, then we’re cutting services.  Lewis said that every year since he’s been on the board they’ve spent money out of the reserve fund.
  Dave Krug indicated he thought Thursday’s meeting was an idea search, with committee members to make recommendations for budget cuts, like tossing spaghetti at the wall to see if it sticks.  Then, through the media the committee would get feedback on what the public thinks.
  Chuck Zenner said again that January 15th was too soon.
  Lewis challenged, "when are you proposing we pose the referendum"?
  Zenner indicated he didn’t have a date.
  Krug said he agreed it was too hasty.  He called it a very delicate process involving people’s livelihood. "At some point we may have to challenge the state, we can’t go on like this".
  Lester Lewis made a motion to recommend that the county board postpone the referendum asking for up to $1 million until the April 2016 ballot.  The measure to postpone the referendum passed by a 4 yes 3 no votes.  At that point Supervisor Lewis stood up and left the meeting, indicating he had better ways to spend his time.
  Chairman Zenner asked the group for ideas on additional revenues for the county.  Department heads indicated that they could charge more for permits, they reminded the committee that the funds would be coming from tax payers and that would only add several thousand dollars to the bottom line.  Larry Wobeking indicated that 10 inmates from Marathon County would be housed in Taylor County’s jail bringing in an extra $400 per day. 
  Jim Metz asked if the sheriff’s department could share squad cars.  Larry Wobeking responded that they currently have about 12 and would need to have at least 4 or 5.  But he cautioned that instead of replacing 2 per year as they do now, they would need to replace 4 per year.  He said it may cost more as they wouldn’t be able to lease the vehicles.

  Supervisor Fuchs indicated he felt cuts could be made in the Extension Office, maybe with the exception of 4-H.  He said that could save over $200,000.
  Dave Krug said he saw a value on paying 40 cents on the dollar for research information from specialists.  The state pays 60% of the extension department expenses.  Mr. Krug felt perhaps 2 of the extension departments could be scrutinized. 
  Mr. Fuchs said that perhaps law enforcement could cut from 3 on each shift down to 2.  And that the highway department could save fuel and miles by not doing full patrols each day.  He said when it snows the drivers could be on-call and eliminate overtime pay.
  Chuck Zenner felt that cuts could be made to the Westboro library, the humane society, the grazing specialist, the assistant position in the register of deeds office, and some of the fair board expenses.
  Continuing on potential cuts, Jim Metz questioned Northwest Regional Planning, who’s incubator building in Medford which was designed for business start-ups, is now a glorified storage building.
  Scott Mildebrand suggested closing the housing authority office and shifting it to Northwest Regional.    He suggested cutting the support staff in the Veterans Service Office to ½ time, shave $20,000 from the airport budget, and $20,000 from the IT office, not replacing a half time retiree.  He felt the conference training budget could be cut by 20%, and the highway department equipment replacement fund could be trimmed.
  Tim Hanson suggested eliminating the Human Services department financial director for a savings of $100,000.  He wanted highway department overtime eliminated by changing the schedule.  Regarding the funding of the ambulance service he felt Aspirus could take a more active role.
  Supervisor Krug questioned the $14,000 for the uniform address system.  He also thought that county board pay should be capped for half day attendance.
  Dave Bizer questioned the $5,000 given as startup money every year for the Taylor County Fair.
  Mr. Zenner asked if any county property could be sold such as the Pirus shooting range?
  Jim Metz concluded the meeting by asking all department heads to talk with board members about suggestions for efficiency.
  The Taylor County Board will vote in December on whether or not to delay the proposed April referendum which is asking for up to $1 million in additional county budget funding.

Subscribe To This Feed

"A Half Million Taylor County Budget Problems"


  How do you trim over a half million dollars from a county budget?
  Very carefully!  Monday morning County board chairman Jim Metz urged a joint meeting of the personnel and finance committees to be careful with what they do to county employees.  Chairman Metz told the group he didn’t like the idea of chopping employees to make budget.  As an opening statement to the meeting Mr. Metz continued:  “While the state government is holding us to the wire, I’d encourage you guys to be careful”.
  County accountant Larry Brandl indicated that the projected 2016 budget is $515,519 over the levy limit.  He indicated a lot of counties are in the same situation.  He also urged a degree of consideration and urged the committees to think this thing out while trying to overcome the half million dollar deficit.
  Sheriff Bruce Daniels expressed optimism at increasing jail revenues.  The Marathon County jail has a capacity of 250 inmates and currently has 367 inmates.  Taylor County has a capacity of 88 and now has 37 inmates.  Sheriff Daniels indicated the jail could take in 33 inmates from neighboring counties with each of them bringing in revenue of $45 per day.
  Supervisor Lewis said he didn’t think continually borrowing money to operate was a good way to run county government.  He felt one department which should be scrutinized was the extension.
Taylor County voters will be asked for up to an additional $1 million in a spring referendum.  Supervisor Scott Mildebrand felt that voters wanted to see what services would be cut if the referendum fails.
Supervisor Tim Hanson didn’t feel it was realistic to think the committees could formulate a list of vulnerable programs before January 15th.  Lewis disagreed saying the committee could come back with operational budget adjustment recommendations and leave the actual decision of how to meet those budgets to the department head.
  Chuck Zenner suggested straight percentage cuts to all departments.  Mr. Lewis felt the smaller departments couldn’t do that, and said he felt only the bigger departments could make significant cuts. 
Supervisor Fuchs said he felt only 3 or 4 departments could be looked at for budget adjustments.  He said the board tries to make cuts every year at budget time and it’s difficult.  He asked the group:  “who do we cut?”
  Once again the Extension was brought up and Land Conservation was brought into question.Lewis said that many counties have combined their Land Conservation, Zoning and Forestry departments.  But, he said I don’t know if it would save any money.

  Supervisor Dave Krug said this committee was influenced by political pressure recently when they voted to hire a full time Veterans Service Officer.  He said, if you talk about cutting Extension, you haven’t seen anything yet.
  The issue of how to possibly trim a half million dollars from the 2016 Taylor County Budget will be dealt with next at a joint personnel and finance committee meeting on Thursday.

Subscribe To This Feed

Medford Flag Field & Legacy Wall Fund Drive Underway


   The Landua Jensen American Legion Post #147 in Medford is conducting a drive to raise funds to help with the cost of constructing an expansion to the Veteran's Memorial Wall at the Flag Field.  The current wall has been filled and the American Legion continues to get requests for stones to honor the veterans from our area.  The project is hoping to expand the Legacy Wall to accommodate an additional 288 stones at a cost estimated at $31,681.00.  Medford Flag Field Project Chairman, Roger Emmerich, recently stopped by the K99 Radio Studios in Medford and shared with K99's Russ Gowey some of the history of the Legacy Wall and the goals and hopes the American Legion Post #147 has for it's future......................

 

Roger Emmerich w/K99's Russ Gowey Part 1

 

 

Roger Emmerich w/K99's Russ Gowey Part 2

 

Subscribe To This Feed

18th Annual Christmas Wish Program Underway


  WKEB/WIGM Radio, Taylor Electric Cooperative, along with Touchstone Energy and members of area cooperatives are once again sponsoring the Christmas Wish Program.  Contributors to the Christmas Wish have undertaken a mission to bring holiday cheer into the lives of those around us.  Christmas Wish requests will be accepted until December 12, 2014.  Send your wish request for someone who needs some holiday cheer to: WKEB/WIGM Radio, P.O. Box 59, Medford, Wisconsin 54451, phone 715-748-2566, fax 715-748-2752 or visit the K99 Radio web site...k99wigm.com.  K99's Russ Gowey recently chatted with Taylor Electric Cooperative President and CEO, Mike Schaefer about this season's Christmas Wish Program....

 

K99's Russ Gowey w/Mike Schaefer

 

Subscribe To This Feed

Medford Bomb Scare Suspect Makes Court Appearance


  The former Medford High School student who is facing a felony Bomb Scare charge was in Taylor County Court on Tuesday.  Jacob Gouza, appeared with his attorney Daniel Cveykus.  District Attorney Kristi Tlusty requested that bond be continued at $3,000 with the conditions that Jacob Gouza use no social media and not enter any property owned by the Medford School District.  Judge Ann Knox-Bauer agreed and stipulated that Gouza would be allowed to continue attending the alternative school.  The pretrial conference for Jacob Gouza was set for January 15th at 9:30.
  Following Gouza’s appearance during a brief recess, court security officer Lisa Kaufmann asked a male subject to leave the courtroom as she smelled the odor of intoxicants.  The individual took a sobriety test in the courthouse hallway.  When Judge Knox-Bauer returned to the courtroom she was informed by D.A. Tlusty that the defendant, John Whetstone had blown a .12.  The judge ordered him held in the county jail until he is legally sober.  Whetstone had been scheduled to appear in court for possession drug paraphernalia.

Subscribe To This Feed

November 19th Taylor County Personnel Meeting Gets "Heated"


  With the cold snow blowing outside, the Taylor County Personnel committee meeting got a bit heated at times Wednesday.  With the recent resignation of the county’s Veterans Service Officer, the committee approved Marie Albers as acting head of the office with a pay raise of $3 per hour. 
  About a dozen veterans were in attendance to show their support for the veterans service officer position.  Dave Krug spoke indicating that as a veteran, he felt that while the job is important, the work load doesn’t justify a full time position.  He said there was documented evidence which couldn’t be released now, which indicates we don’t need a full time veteran’s service officer.  He told the group that Administrative Assistant Marie Albers does the bulk of the work.
  Marie Albers was asked for her opinion and she indicated that a part time Veterans Service Officer possibly would be part time committed to our veterans.  She said that in 2012 veterans assistance programs provided in excess of $3 million to vets in Taylor County.
  Lester Lewis asked Ms. Albers if the office staff was cut to 1.5 positions, who would be part time, the officer or assistant.  Marie Albers replied the veterans deserve a full time officer advocate.  But she didn’t think it was fair to ask her to cut her position.
  Chuck Zenner indicated he felt the veterans office could operate with 1.5 positions, with Marie fulltime and the Officer half time, until Marie retires then the service officer would be full time and assistant half time.
  Ray Soper expressed frustration indicating it’s wrong to base job descriptions on current staff capabilities.  He said the first job of the officer is to be an advocate for veterans.  Soper felt the county needs a full time veterans service officer.
  Scott Mildebrand said eventually the office will be 1.5, best served by a full time V.S.O. and part time assistant.
  Bob Lee told the committee it’s tough to get an advocate for injured veterans.  He said,  "when you’re strong and capable to march, they take good care of you, but when you’re injured, they don’t care so much".  Mr. Lee continued, "this is not a position to cut, when you make a decision, consider who you’re affecting". 
  An Iraq veteran addressed the group indicating he spent 2 years in Iraq and has recently learned he has a heart condition.   He said, "if you cut the position, where will I go"?
  The committee voted unanimously to hire a full time Veterans Service Officer.
  Viet Nam veteran Gary Henkel stood up after the vote and said, "you talk about finances.  If you cut the veterans service officer here in Taylor County, how many veterans would move to a county with a full time Veterans Service officer"?  

  Next the committee considered replacing an administrative support position shared by the Forestry and Zoning departments.  Scott Mildebrand suggested waiting until the January 15th county board meeting, telling the group it’s not business as usual.

  Chuck Zenner said we keep saying we have budget constraints, but nothing changes, I support waiting.
  Zoning Administrator Kyle Noonan said if the position wasn’t filled they couldn’t stay afloat and plumbers, electricians and homeowners would be put on hold.
  The vote to fill the position failed by a 3 to 2 vote.

Subscribe To This Feed

Sheriff's Officer Assailant Gets 40 Years in Prison


  The Westboro man who fired near-fatal shots at a Taylor County deputy is headed to prison.  Judge Ann Knox Bauer presided in Taylor County Court on Friday, October 31st with defendant Alexander Schneider dressed in an orange jail jumpsuit.  Special agent David Forsythe testifed that he interviewed Schneider after his arrest.  Schneider told the agent how he knew that Deputy Chad Kowalcyk couldn't see him when he pulled up a :22 caliber rifle and shot at the officer's head, then went back to a bedroom in his Town of Westboro home on September 8th, 2013 and waited for the fleeing officer to take another 3 shots as he approached his squad car.  He admitted the officer was just doing his job and he shot him. During emergency surgery, a bullet, which entered the side of Officer Kowalcyk was removed from his colon.  The chief surgeon indicated the bullet missed a major artery by 1 centimeter. Had the bullet severed the artery, Officer Kowalcyk would have died within minutes.  A second bullet was found, believed to have been stopped by his bullet proof vest.

  District Attorney Kristi Tlusty played an audio recording from Officer Kowalcyk's recorder which gave the sounds of the moments leading up to the shooting.  Officer Kowalcyk knocks on the door, then pleads with Schneider to come out of his Westboro mobile home.  Schneider yells through the closed door a barrage of profanities.  After several minutes, Deputy Kowalcyk can be heard calling dispatch for back up, calmly voicing concern that Schneider may be suicidal.  Then the officer tells Schneider to trust him.  Moments later, shots ring out and the sound of a person running away is heard.  After an interlude of running sounds, more shots are heard and Officer Kowalcyk's voice is heard radioing "shots fired, shots fired, I think I'm hit".

  Next, Deputy Chad Kowalcyk took the stand.  He told the court that he was responding to a restraining order violation on the day of the shooting.  He said it was difficult to come to court because he's a pretty "humble guy".  He began getting emotional when he said, "if you play this incident over again and again, 9 out of 10 times you'll have a dead officer."  He told the court that one bullet grazed his face and the other one nearly killed him.  His voice cracked as he told how it's difficult to explain to a 3 year old and his girlfriend why this happened and it's not going to happen again.  He wakes up everyday and looks at the surgical scars.  Officer Kowalcyk told the court that Schneider "did everything in his power to end my life."  Kowalcyk concluded by saying "I'd be very disappointed if anything other than the maximum sentence was imposed".  The judge asked him if he suffers from any physical problems as a result of his injuries.  Kowalcyk called them minimal, but said his digestive system isn't the same and he has to watch what he eats.

  D.A. Kristi Tlusty asked the judge to impose the maximum sentence of 40 years and 20 years of extended supervision.  She told the court, Schneider lacks remorse and shows no interest in rehabilitation.  She said "this wasn't an accident".  The D.A. continued saying "the impact is always present, now every time family members hear a siren, they wonder if their loved one will be shot".

  Defense attorney Vorhees told the court that Schneider had expressed a high degree of hopelessness and helplessness in his life.  He said it scares Schneider a lot that he's wasted his life.  He had a chaotic childhood and never knew his father.

  Defendent Schneider addressed the court beginning with an apology to the court, indicating he had a hard time understanding everything which had occurred.  He said he didn't like who he was.  He apologized to the individuals he hurt or was illegally involved with.  He said when he heard the recording of Officer Kowalcyk asking for backup fearing Schneder's suicide, he heard honest concern in the officer's voice.  He said he only found out yesterday that the officer has a 3 year old son.  Schneider continued saying, "I've never had a relationship with a father, I can't imagine his son losing his father".

  Judge Knox-Bauer expressed her concern about how Schneider had hidden a sawed off shotgun in the abandoned house next door to use on either himself or law enforcement.  She said it was "by the grace of God that Deputy Kowalcyk is here".  She compared law enforcement jobs to soldiers.  She spoke of the impact of being shot, that horror will never be forgotten by him, his son, his significant other, his colleagues and community.  The judge expressed her disgust with the fact that after his arrest, Schneider assaulted another inmate and a jailer while in jail.  She said that at age 29, Schneider was beyond adolescence, when young people make mistakes.  In stern words, Judge Knox Bauer told Schneider that "others have had crappy upbringings, but others don't have sex with a minor, shoot at an officer or beat up people in jail".  The judge called Schneider a very dangerous individual with a high risk to re-offend.  She felt he didn't fully appreciate all that these people will go through because of him.

  The judge imposed the maximum sentence of 60 years, which includes 40 years of prison and 20 years of extended supervision, if eligible.  A cash bond of $5,300 was applied to restitution and court costs.  The judge indicated they need to "protect our community and send a message, suicide by cop is not acceptable".

Subscribe To This Feed

Taylor County Board Approves 2015 Budget


  The Taylor County Board of Supervisors met Wednesday morning (Oct 29).   They presented a plaque to retiree Jean Nuernberger for her 33 years of service with human services and the circuit court.
Recently, Bobbi Damrau of N.T.C. asked the county board members of the education committee if they had specific goals.  Roger Ewan indicated the committee supported NTC’s efforts with the Literacy Council and a program for people over age 18 becoming eligible to receive a diploma.   Sue Breneman indicated she resides in the Chippewa Valley Tech district but was a member of the NTC education committee.  Rollie Thums proposed trimming membership from 3 to 1 county board member.  He felt there was a disconnect between the county board and NTC.  Sheriff Bruce Daniels expressed his support for NTC programs indicating that he recently received a grant for his leadership staff to attend employee development classes with college credits at no cost to the county.  The county’s conservation department utilizes NTC’s nutrient management programs.  Mr Thums indicated that none of the county board committee members were aware of the programs and questioned the need for paying 3 committee members to attend bi-monthly NTC meetings.  Sue Breneman called it a waste of taxpayer money.   The board voted to refer the county’s membership on the NTC education committee to the committee on rules for their recommendation.  

  Should the county board meet at designated times, or when there is a need to meet?  Supervisor Sue Breneman told the board that many people in her district are surprised there aren’t set meetings.  She requested that the board meet on designated dates either monthly or bi-monthly.  She indicated the county board is the only government body in the county which doesn’t meet on designated dates.  Lester Lewis responded that Taylor County has transitioned to a committee run system.  He felt it is a more efficient way to get things done on a county level to meet on an “as needed” basis.  Chuck Zenner agreed that the committees run the county.  But, he said, if you’re not on a “major” committee, you’re out of the loop.  Sue Breneman felt that more county board meetings would provide transparency for the taxpayers.  Dennis Fuchs indicated the county would have to change their whole structure of how they do business to make the meetings meaningful.  Supervisor Bizer questioned whether it was in the best interest of taxpayers to pay $50 to 17 members for every meeting.  Diane Albrecht indicated she stays informed by reading the minutes of other committee meetings on her computer.  The issue of how often the county board should meet was referred to the committee on committee on rules.

  Representative Mary Williams presented the county with a flag that was flown over the state capital on the date of the courthouse rededication.  Mrs. Williams reminded those present that she started on the county board and she urged them to consider making a run for the state senate or assembly.

  The board agreed with Highway commissioner Jess Sackmann to not spend nearly $220,000 for a 3 mile bikeway.  The blacktop pavement on County E between County O and A is scheduled to be replaced.  Wisconsin Code trans 75 requires the construction of bikeways on certain roads unless there is excessive cost, and the board could not justify an additional 25% cost to add a bikeway on the rural highway.
  There was considerable discussion regarding spending powerline impact money for the purchase of an $18,000 Honda UTV with tracks and heated cab for grooming trails and tubing hill at the Perkinstown Winter Sports area.  Lester Lewis felt a machine for half that price could to the job.  Mckovskey felt they could use the airports machine.  Chuck Zenner indicated it would cost $8,000 to make the airport’s machine compatible for the task.  Jim Metz felt the powerline fees were intended for this purpose and supported the purchase.  The board voted 15 to 2 in favor of purchasing the UTV with powerline impact money.
  The board acted on the 2015 budget and approved 2 amendments to the proposed budget.  The first addition was $110,000 to add a financial supervisor position and remodeling at human services.  The county’s auditors strongly recommended the change indicating that the expertise in obtaining grant funds could pay for the position.  Supervisor Scott Mildebrand felt it was irresponsible to spend money the county doesn’t have.  He asked the board to wait until they identify the areas to be affected by proposed cuts in January.   Human Services director Amber Fallos said the county was losing out by not having a financial supervisor.  The amendment to create the new position using money from the fund balance passed on an 11 yes and 5 no vote with Hanson, Lee, Mildebrand, Thums and Soper voting no.

  The next change to the budget came with Tim Hanson speaking on behalf of the county libraries which had $25,887 trimmed from their combined budgets.  Hanson indicated that the cuts amounted to 15% of the Rib Lake library budget.  The money would be transferred from the savings of a proposed note refinance measure.  Rollie Thums warned the board to not turn their backs on education.  The board was unanimous in restoring $25,887 to the county library budget.
  Ultimately the board approved the revised county budget of just under $11 million.  The budget will result in a mill rate of $8.27, compared with $8.17 last year which will result in an additional $10.00 tax on a $100,000 property.   
  With state tax limits the board is facing a 2016 deficit forecast to be about $500,000.  Lester Lewis proposed a referendum which would ask county residents to allow the county to exceed the levy limit by $1 million per year for 5 years.   Lewis proposed taking $500,000 for funding possible programs which otherwise would be cut, $100,000 for highways, and $400,000 to boost the county’s dwindling reserves.  By a 15 to 1 vote with Soper voting no, the board approved a referendum on the spring ballot which will seek approval to not exceed $1 million over the state levy limit each of the next 5 years.

  Judge Ann Knox-Bauer addressed the board and supported a resolution which would object to a proposed lapse in state funding to the Wisconsin circuit court system.  The cuts which are included in the pending 2015-17 state budget would eliminate $66,000 which taylor county would need to add into future budgets.  The board was unanimous is their opposition to the proposed cuts.
  The county board was unanimous in supporting resolutions for the county bridge aid, and the 2015 Highway Department equipment schedule with expenditures of $450,000.  They approved appointing Scott Perrin as medical examiner and Schmiege and Graff as Corporation Counsel.  The board supported authorizing a general obligation note in an amount not to exceed $4,385,000 with $1 million additional funding for maintaining the taylor county highway system.  That was some of the business which was conducted at the Taylor County Board meeting on Wednesday.

Subscribe To This Feed

Happy 100th Birthday, Gertie!


  On Sunday, November 2nd, 2014, Gertrude Vetter of Medford will celebrate her 100th birthday.  On Sunday, October 26th, Gertie was honored as the Grand Marshall of the Harvest Days Parade in Medford.   Gertie was kind enough to stop by the WKEB Radio Studios in Medford and share some stories and reminiscences from her century of good living.  Gertie also has a little advice to pass on to the younger generation.  You'll find that advice in section 4...

 

GERTIE PART 1

 

 

GERTIE PART 2

 

 

GERTIE PART 3

 

 

GERTIE PART 4

 

Subscribe To This Feed

What You Need To Know About Enterovirus D68


Every year, millions of children in the United States catch enteroviruses that can cause coughing, sneezing and fever.  This year, the enterovirus that is most commonly causing respiratory illness in children across the country is enterovirus D68.  Patty Krug of the Taylor County Health Department recently stopped by the K99 Radio Studios in Medford and shared with K99's Russ Gowey what every parent needs to know about enterovirus D68 and how to take basic steps to help keep your child from getting and spreading EV-D68......

 

Patty Krug w/K99's Russ Gowey

 

Subscribe To This Feed

2nd Bomb Threat at MASH


  On Friday, October 3rd, 2014, staff at the Medford Area Senior High School were made aware of a second bomb threat this week.  Earlier this week, students and staff were evacuated and the school building was searched after staff at Medford Area Senior High School were made aware a bomb threat.  The bomb threat on Friday, October 3rd did not require an evacuation of the building, however, making bomb threats is a serious matter.  Medford Area School District Superintendent Pat Sullivan gives K99 Radio details of this current bomb threat and possible further actions by the Medford School Board......

 

Medford School District Superintendent Pat Sullivan w/K99's Patrick Porten

 

Subscribe To This Feed

Press Release from Medford Police Department


October 2, 2014 at about 12:45pm The Medford School District alerted the Medford Police Department of a bomb threat.  In messages that originated from a site known as "Yik Yak" the suspect made two different threats referring to bombs in his locker.  After law enforcement and school officials reviewed the material and determined the threat came from inside the Medford Senior High Campus, the school was evacuated and searched.

 

During the investigation Officers were able to determine the threat was sent from inside the high school and further identified a suspect by use of geo-tracking.  Additionally, through interviews and assistance from "Yik Yak" Officers made contact with a 17 year old suspect and questioned him about the bomb threats.  The suspect when confronted admitted to the threats that he posted online.

 

Prior to locating the suspect, the Taylor County Sheriff's Department, Medford Fire Department and Medford School District Employees assisted the Medford Police Department with the search and evacuation of the Medford Senior High School.

 

The incident is being referred to the Taylor County District Attorney's Office for charges under Wisconsin Statute 947.015 Bomb Scare.

Subscribe To This Feed

MASH Bomb Threat


  On Wednesday afternoon, October 1st, 2014, the staff at the Medford Area Senior High School became aware of a bomb threat directed toward the Medford Area Senior High School.  Students and staff were evacuated and local law enforcement began a search of the Medford Area Senior High School.  No bomb was found.   All after school activities on Wednesday, October 1st at the Medford Area Senior High School are canceled.  Students may pick up their vehicles in the Medford Area Senior School parking lot, however, the Medford Area Senior High School building remains under lock down Wednesday night, October 1st.  All classes will resume as per usual on Thursday, October 2nd, 2014...for more details...check out our audio report....

 

Medford Fire Depatrment Member Brad Dahlvig & Medford School Superintendent Pat Sullivan 

 

Subscribe To This Feed

Conditional Release Denied for Heidi Mann


Conditional Release Denied For Heidi Mann
  Heidi Mann, the Rib Lake woman who is serving time in the Winnebago Mental Health Institute for attempting to take her own life and the lives of 4 of her children was in Taylor County Court requesting a conditional release.  The first person to testify on the second day of testimony was Kylie Fitzgerald of Taylor County Human Services.  Ms. Fitzgerald testified in closed session for nearly an hour.  When open court convened, Heidi Mann took the witness stand.  She expressed her frustration with human services for allowing her husband to supervise the visits at Winnebago with her 3 youngest children.  She told the court that the kids want more ‘mommy’ time.  She expressed her frustration that she needed her husband’s permission to speak with the kids on the phone.  D.A. Kristi Tlusty told Mann that this was a high profile case and that everyone in their small town knew what she tried to do to her children.  If she was to be released, would she be able to handle the everyday stressors?  The D.A. told Mann that in Winnebago there are specialists who help you handle the day to day stress.  Fighting back tears, Heidi Mann told the court “I love my kids, I tried to get help, I want my kids to heal”.
  Mark Mann was called to the stand.  He told the court he has taken their 3 youngest children to Winnebago for visits with their mom every-other weekend.  He indicated the 3 older children don’t want to see her.  Mr. Mann was asked about the couple’s impending divorce.  He testified that he believed in working through problems.  But when he discovered that his wife was in an intimate relationship with another man, he didn’t think that was in the best interest of the children. 
  In closing D.A. Tlusty told the court that Heidi Mann’s present mental status is “stable”.  But she said it should be as she is on medications and under structured programs in an institution.  D.A. Tlusty told the court the nature and circumstances of the crime was the most important factor.  She said:  “It’s not often that a parent attempts to kill their children”.  She scolded Mann and said it was difficult to understand how she was able to have religious beliefs that if she killed her kids, she would go to heaven.  Ms. Tlusty finished by asking the court to deny the release because she wasn’t willing to gamble on the lives of innocent children.

  Heidi Mann’s attorney Karl Kelz talked about the conflicting opinions of the 3 specialists.  He said, this is not an exact science but one of the psychiatrists issued a glowing report.  He cited one doctor’s opinion that Mann could suffer a relapse in 6 to 10 years as “Pretty Speculative”.  Kelz told the court that while it’s a hot button issue, he was requesting a conditional release with supervision.
  Judge Ann Knox-Bauer indicated that Heidi Mann had the right to request the conditional release, which she did in July.  The judge indicated her decision was guided by the doctor’s reports and other issues including: the nature of the crime and where would she live?  The doctor’s testimony made mention of psychotic features, the idea that the kids would be better off dead than going through divorce.  The judge continued saying that Heidi Mann thought for days what to do with her children, concluding that heaven was better than Mark and his family.  The judge stated that past behavior is a fair predictor of future behavior and that Winnebago is a more controlled setting to address Ms. Mann’s health needs.  The judge concluded by saying:  “Release at this time would be a recipe for disaster for the community, family, friends and most importantly, Ms. Mann.”  Heidi Mann can apply to the court for conditional release again in six months.  

Subscribe To This Feed

Young Boy Dies While Playing


Young Boy Dies While Playing

 

An evening of “Child’s Play” turned deadly Tuesday night (Sept 9).  According to Sheriff Bruce Daniels,  at 5:50 PM Tuesday the Taylor County Dispatch Center received a 9-1-1 call requesting an ambulance at N2778 Highway 97 in the Town of Goodrich.  The caller indicated that a 9 year old boy had apparently fallen while playing in the hay mow of the family barn and was in distress.  Emergency responders from the Taylor County Sheriff’s office, Medford Ambulance and Medford Area Fire Department along with Medivac Air responded to the location.   Highway 97 was closed to traffic to allow the Medivac helicopter to land on the roadway.  Sadly, despite aggressive lifesaving efforts on the part of family and emergency responders, the 9 year old boy succumbed to injuries which he suffered while playing and ultimately falling from a rope swing located in his family’s hay mow.  No foul play is suspected in this tragic incident.
 

Subscribe To This Feed

Medford Gunman Makes Court Appearance


  The 19 year old Medford man, who is the alleged gunman in Saturday's Medford city shooting, was in Taylor County Court Tuesday morning, September 2nd.  Taylor County District Attorney Kristi Tlusty indicated that Harrison Davis is facing serious felony charges and felt that a significant bail was justified.  She requested bond to be set at $50,000 cash.  Further, she requested that Davis have no contact with Jason Crabb or Michelle Dyer.

  Judge Anne Knox-Bauer agreed with the D.A. and ordered Davis be held in the Taylor County Jail with bond set at $50,000 cash.  Davis is to have no contact with either Jason Crabb or Michelle Dyer. He is prohibited from posessing firearms.

  Harrison Davis' initial court appearance is set for Tuesday, September 23rd at 1:00 P.M.

  Davis is accused of shooting into a Park Avenue home in the city of Medford on Saturday afternoon, then fleeing the scene, eventually crashing his car near the Chippewa and Taylor County line. Reports indicated that three sheriff's dogs tracked down Davis, who was apprehended in a swamp without further incident.

Subscribe To This Feed

Shooting in Medford ***UPDATED***


  On Saturday, August 30th at 2:56 P.M., the Taylor County Dispatch Center received a 911 call of shots being fired into a house in the 500 block of South Park Avenue in the City of Medford.  Officers responded to the scene and during  their investigation they received information regarding a suspect and vehicle information.  From witness statements and electronic tracking, law enforcement officers were able to determine the direction of travel of the suspect and eventually located the suspect's vehicle in the ditch of the 35000 block of County Highway M in Chippewa County.

  Saturday night at approximately 6:15 P.M.,  law enforcement officers from the Chippewa County Sheriff's Department, Taylor County Sheriff's Department, Medford Police Department and the Department of Natural Resources arrested 19 year old, Harrison C. Davis of 767 Gibson Street, Medford.  

  Harrison Davis is being referred to the Taylor County District Attorney for 1st degree reckless endangering safety, discharging a firearm in a school zone and discharge of a firearm into a building.

  The shooting incident,  which occured in the 500 block of South Park Avenue in the City of Medford, was within 1000 feet of Holy Rosary Catholic School which is a violation of discharging a firearm in a school zone.  During the shooting students were not in the school but it was later reported there were people setting up for mass within Holy Rosary Catholic Church.

  A Medford High School varsity football game was in progress at the time of the shooting.  As a precaution, the game was suspended, tied 14-14, in the first overtime period and the players, coaching staffs and fans were taking into the Medford Area Senior High School and put on lockdown. Support staff and the radio announcers were put under lock down in the press box.  The lockdown lasted about two hours.  When the all clear signal was given, the game was allowed to resume with Chippewa Falls defeating Medford 22-14 in overtime.

  Harrison Davis remains in custody at the Taylor County Sheriff's Department Jail.

Subscribe To This Feed

87th Republican Assembly Primary Recount is Finally Over


  The 87th Republican Assembly vote recount is finally over.  The recount vote process concluded on Monday, August 25th with James Edming adding one vote to his total.

  While four counties completed their recount on Friday, August 22nd, Sawyer County called a recess and their recount was completed at 3 o'clock on Monday, August 25th.  

  After the official recount, here are the 87th Assembly District county results:

In Clark County, there was no change from the 20 total votes cast .

In Marathon County, Scott Noble gained one vote.

In Rusk County, James Edming lost one vote.

In Taylor County, James Edming gained one vote.

And in Sawyer County, James Edming gained one vote.

The net results of the recount shows that James Edming gained one more vote to build his lead to 18 votes over Michael Bub.  The state Government Accountability Board will now verify the results to make the primary election official.

Subscribe To This Feed

History of Taylor County Comes Alive in New Book


  Did you know that Taylor County has been called "the Garden Spot of Northern Wisconsin"?  Do you know when Taylor County was founded?  Do you know who Taylor County was named for? Author Robert P. Rusch has complied a book featuring photographs, maps and more from Taylor County's past in his new book, "Images of America...Taylor County".  This fascinating book is available for sale at the Taylor County Historical Society in the Taylor County Fairgrounds in Medford and in the Taylor County Court House in Medford.  Recently Robert Rusch and K99's Russ Gowey took a trip through Taylor County History.  Oh, the answers to our Taylor County trivia questions?  Taylor County was founded on March 4, 1875 and was named for then governor William R. Taylor.  If you got those answers right...nice job!  You'll find more such fun facts within the pages of Robert's book!  

 

K99's Russ Gowey w/Robert Rusch Part 1

 

 

K99's Russ Gowey w/Robert Rusch Part 2

 

 

K99's Russ Gowey w/Robert Rusch Part 3

 

 

K99's Russ Gowey w/Robert Rusch Part 4

 

 

K99's Russ Gowey w/Robert Rusch Part 5

 

Subscribe To This Feed

Every Vote Counts! 2014 Primary Election Results


  The Wisconsn Primary Election on Tuesday, August 12th, shows that your vote DOES count.  In the 87th Assembly District Republican Primary, that race is not yet complete because it is so close on the vote count.  On Tuesday night, it appeared as though Michael Bub would win the election by 3 votes.   However, first thing Wednesday morning, August 13th, it was learned that was not the case as 20 votes from Rusk County were switched to the James Edming side due to a preliminary clerical error.     This gave Edming a 17 vote advantage.  K99's Brad Dahlvig reviews the election results and K99's Russ Gowey talks with Rusk County Clerk, Denise Wetzel, to learn what happened in the Rusk County vote count.....

 

K99's Brad Dahlvig w/the election review

 

 

K99's Russ Gowey w/Rusk County Clerk Denise Wetzel

 

     

 



LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services